Drug: Paclitaxel (Taxol) To Treat NSCLC

Paclitaxel (Taxol)Paclitaxel is an anti-cancer chemotherapy drug and is used in treatment of non-small lung cancer. Paclitaxel is also known by its original brand name, Taxol. It is also used in treatment of breast, bladder and other types of solid tumor cancers. The drug works by stopping cancer cells to separate into new cells and thus, blocking the growth of cancer. It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

How is Paclitaxel Given?

Usually, paclitaxel is given as an injection into the vein. It can also be through a thin, short tune which is put into the vein of the arm each time. The treatment plan for this drug depends on the type of cancer, the severity and other aspects. Your doctor gives you paclitaxel as a drip into the cannula or line.  The drug is administered under the supervision of a physician experienced in use of cancer agents.

Precautions When Taking Paclitaxel (Taxol):

Before using this medication, you should talk to doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it. You should provide information about medical history such as infections, heart problems, liver disease, high or low blood pressure or any others.

Side Effects

The side effects of chemo depend on the type and dose of the drug given in addition to how long they are taken. Some of the common side effects include:

Allergic Reaction: Paclitaxel may cause allergic reactions such as feeling itchy, having pain in tummy, rash, feeling dizzy and pain along the vein.

Low blood counts: The white and red blood cells and platelets may decrease on a temporary basis. This can result in increased risk of anemia or bleeding.

Nausea and vomiting: Tiredness and breathlessness may be experienced

Hypersensitivity reaction: Fever, chills or shortness of breath after Paclitaxel is given.

Hair loss: Some may experience hair loss but your hair will grow back after your treatment ends.

Low blood pressure: Low blood pressure can be experienced during the treatment

Course of Paclitaxel

The drug is given as a course of several sessions of treatment over a few months. Each cycle usually takes 21 days, but this mainly depends on the type cancer one has.

The information provided in the post is for educational purposes only.

Leave a Reply